UFC on Fox 16 Reebok payouts (Here comes the money?)

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Because the Reebok money has to go somewhere, and it’s definitely not going to the cutmen.

 

With two UFC title fights in two consecutive weekends, let’s take a look at the Reebok sponsorships for the fighters of the recently concluded UFC on Fox 16: Dillashaw vs. Barao. Will the Reebok payouts of UFC 190 top the total for this one? We’ll see.

As if you didn’t know yet: Beginning July of 2015, Reebok is the exclusive fight week apparel sponsor for the UFC.

Reebok sponsorship amounts paid to fighters are based on tenure: 1-5 fights = $2,500; 6-10 fights = $5,000; 11-15 fights = $10,000; 16-20 fights = $15,000; more than 20 fights gets you $20,000. Title challengers get $30,000 and champions get $40,000.

Aside from UFC fights, Reebok will also credit fights under the Strikeforce and WEC promotion, from the time UFC parent company Zuffa purchased these companies, all the way until their dissolution. For Strikeforce, this covers events starting with Strikeforce Challengers 15 on April 1, 2011. For the WEC, this covers events starting with WEC 25 on January 20, 2007.

Please note that this sponsorship money is separate from the actual fight purses (show and win money) and post-fight bonuses.

In this card, we had one title fight, bringing the total Reebok payout up. Also, which WEC veteran maxed out the Reebok payout for non-title fights? Either go through this detailed breakdown complete with results, or scroll way down to the end of the article for a simplified Reebok payout list.

 

Main card:

T.J. Dillashaw defeated Renan Barao via fourth-round TKO

If Dillashaw weren’t the reigning UFC bantamweight champion, he would’ve gotten $5,000 for his 10th UFC fight. But since he is, he cashes in $40,000.

This was also Barao’s 10th UFC fight. He also has 2 WEC fights under Zuffa, so he would’ve been getting $10,000 for a non-title fight. As the challenger though, he receives $30,000. After two defeats to Dillashaw, Barao better get used to those non-title Reebok payouts.

 

Miesha Tate defeated Jessica Eye via unanimous decision

This was Tate’s 6th UFC fight. Also, 3 of her 8 Strikeforce fights were under Zuffa. She gets $5,000. Assuming she is indeed next in line for the title shot, she’ll get $30,000.
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Luke Thomas on UFC 189: “That is the kind of event that will give you memories for life”

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“This was the promoters and the fighters doing everything possible to execute on fight night.”

(Photo: Youtube video “Luke Thomas Is Pissed”)

Luke Thomas is the senior editor at MMAFighting.com. He hosts a weekly podcast called the Promotional Malpractice live chat and also gives technical breakdowns of recent fight cards through a segment called MMA – Monday Morning Analyst.

UFC 189 not only gave us exciting fights, it also gave us an updated look with new graphics, Reebok-sponsored apparel, and live music for the interim featherweight title main event. Irish artist Sinead O’Connor sang “Foggy Dew” as UFC promotional powerhouse Conor McGregor made his walk to the cage, and Aaron Lewis of Staind sang “Country Boy” for top featherweight contender Chad Mendes.

In the Monday Morning Analyst show immediately following UFC 189, Luke Thomas gave his thoughts on the entire spectacle:

I truly do not know how much better MMA can get. I don’t want to limit my imagination and say it can’t get better, but that’s pretty much as good as it gets, right? Not just because the finishes were brutal, and in that sense, entertainment, but the stakes were high.

You saw the devastating power of what elite MMA looks like. There was clarity about the finishes. The guys who won, basically deserved to win. There were important match-ups, and you saw a variety of weight classes.

It wasn’t the perfect event. I don’t know what event ever would be perfect. But I truly, when watching this, I just don’t know how much better MMA gets. And when you think of it in those terms, it’s just so special. It’s just so utterly and completely without parallel.

I’m a pretty big critic of the UFC. I think a lot of MMA media is just cheerleading nonsense, because a lot of the MMA media are fans. I am too, I suppose, but someone’s gotta be out there pointing out some of the flaws, right? Someone’s gotta do it, so I’ll do it.
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Results for UFC Fight Night: Bisping vs. Leites, plus complete Reebok payouts (Here comes the money?)

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Matchmaker Sean Shelby: “Guys! No need to fight at the weigh-ins for so little Reebok sponsorship money!”

 

Ladies and gentlemen, the Reebok Power Rangers have invaded Scotland. Below are complete results for UFC Fight Night: Bisping vs. Leites, which was held in Glasgow.

We also have individual Reebok payouts for each fighter on the card. Beginning this month, July of 2015, Reebok is now the exclusive fight week apparel sponsor for the UFC. Reebok sponsorship amounts paid to fighters are based on tenure: 1-5 fights = $2,500; 6-10 fights = $5,000; 11-15 fights = $10,000; 16-20 fights = $15,000; more than 20 fights gets you $20,000. Title challengers get $30,000 and champions get $40,000. Please note that this sponsorship money is separate from the actual fight purses (show and win money) and post-fight bonuses.

In this card, we have one veteran fighter maxing out the Reebok payout for non-title fights, and an undercard full of mostly European fighters bouncing around in the 1-5 fight range. Did this card beat the lowest total Reebok payout of $90,000 set by The Ultimate Fighter 21 Finale? Either go through this detailed breakdown complete with results, or scroll way down to the end for a simplified Reebok payout list.

 

Main card

Michael Bisping defeated Thales Leites via split decision (47-48, 49-46, 48-47) (Middleweight)

Bisping has consistently fought 2-3 times each year for the UFC since 2006. Because of his dogged consistency, he has maxed out the Reebok payout limit for non-title fights. He gets $20,000 for his 24th UFC fight. Leites gets $10,000 for his 14th UFC fight.
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